Five Ways to Improve your Customer Feedback Survey Response Rates


Asking customers for feedback is an essential part of the improvement process for any business, and I’m pleased to say that many companies now do ask their customers for feedback.

Most companies do this through methods like Customer Satisfaction (CSat) surveys, Net Promoter Score (NPS) or Customer Effort Score (CES).

But, many of them, despite working hard to deliver great service and build up trust with their customers, undo a lot of their great work through the way that they go about their surveys and feedback process.

That probably explains why many firms only achieve around a 2% response rate on their surveys.

But, all is not lost as other firms have been known to achieve response rates in the 50-75% range.

Here’s five things that leading companies are doing that are helping them achieve higher response rates and, therefore, a much richer source of feedback from their customers:

1. Make it Relevant

Many customer surveys fall into the trap of asking questions that are only relevant to the company or are expressed in ‘company speak’. That’s a mistake and a turn-off for customers.

When designing your survey make sure you only ask questions that are relevant to your customers and their experience.

So, include questions like: how did we do, did everything arrive on time, was our engineer friendly/helpful/clean & tidy, was everything to your satisfaction, are you likely to buy from us again etc?

2. Keep it Short

Remember that you are asking your customers to invest some of their time in helping you understand how you are doing and how you can get better.

Research has shown that 80% of customers have abandoned surveys that they see as being too long, while less than 14% of customers are willing to spend more than five minutes on completing a feedback form.

Therefore, don’t abuse your customers’ time and keep your surveys as short and as simple as possible.

It respects your customers’ time, is only common courtesy, is likely to encourage a better response rate and, in doing so, you are likely to protect the relationship that you have built up with your customer.

3. Make it Timely

Too often do firms send out surveys in batches to large numbers of customers. That might be convenient and make sense for the business but may put a significant delay between when some customers have interacted with the business and when they receive a survey.

What that means is that the survey can end up feeling like it is disconnected from their experience and, thus, they are less likely to respond.

To get better results, move your surveying approach away from batch and/or mass surveys to one that is linked to important moments or touchpoints along the customer’s journey.

4. Ask for More Than a Score

Most surveys ask customers to provide a score or rating that allows them to measure their performance and how they are doing against their brand promises.

However, many miss out the opportunity to ask their customers an open ended question like….what did we do well, what could we do better, is there anything that we don’t do that you would like us to do? etc etc.

To miss this type of question out of a feedback survey misses out tapping into the wealth of insight that is within your customers’ minds but also may highlight a number of areas and opportunities that you may have overlooked.

5. Make Sure you Report Back

Many firms ask for feedback from their customers but few follow through and do anything about it. Fewer still take action based on the feedback and only a very few actually report back to their customers what they have done with their feedback.

Research has shown that 95% of companies ask their customers for feedback, 50% communicate the results to their employees, 30% analyse the results, decide what they are going to do about them and start to create action plans, 10% put their plan into action but only 5% of companies communicate their plans to their customers.

Those numbers present a huge opportunity for companies that are committed to improving their service and the experience that they deliver to their customers, if they are willing to go further than most and complete the feedback loop.

It’s a bit like a friend asking for your opinion or advice on something and then they never tell you what they did with the advice.

How would you feel about that? And, how likely would you be to give your advice or an opinion again?

I would suggest that most people wouldn’t feel too great about that and would be less likely to offer up their advice or opinion again.

Arguably, the same can be said to be true for companies. This, therefore, represents an opportunity for some firms who are willing to put the effort in to closing the feedback loop.

Doing so is likely to help them not only stand out amongst their competitors, but also build stronger and more open relationships with their customers.

This blog post has been re-published by kind permission of Adrian Swinscoe – View the original post

About the author

Adrian Swinscoe Adrian Swinscoe has been growing and developing customer-focused large and small businesses for 20 years, in particular how they engage with their customers, build their customer retention and improve service. His driving passion is helping create, develop and grow businesses that take care of their customers in the best way possible and create great teams to deliver that. As a result, he helps companies with their business and team performance issues which result in increased profits, sales, better productivity, word of mouth and better service and an overall customer and employee experience.

Read other posts by Adrian Swinscoe

Call Centre Helper is not responsible for the content of these guest blog posts. The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect those of Call Centre Helper.

Published On: 14th Aug 2017 - Last modified: 15th Aug 2017
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