Zoom Doubles Down on Security as Threat Landscape Evolves

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Filed under - Contact Centre News,

Zoom Video Communications has announced that post-quantum end-to-end encryption (E2EE) is now globally available for Zoom Workplace, specifically Zoom Meetings, with Zoom Phone and Zoom Rooms coming soon.

The launch of the new security enhancement makes Zoom the first UCaaS company to offer a post-quantum E2EE solution for video conferencing.

As adversarial threats become more sophisticated, so does the need to safeguard user data. In certain circumstances, attackers may have the ability to capture encrypted network traffic now, with the intent to decrypt it later when quantum computers become more advanced — a scenario often referred to as “harvest now, decrypt later”.

So, while powerful quantum computers with this capability are not yet generally available, Zoom has taken a proactive stance by upgrading the algorithms designed to be able to withstand these potential future threats.

“Since we launched end-to-end encryption for Zoom Meetings in 2020 and Zoom Phone in 2022, we have seen customers increasingly use the feature, which demonstrates how important it is for us to offer our customers a secure platform that meets their unique needs,” said Michael Adams, chief information security officer at Zoom.

“With the launch of post-quantum E2EE, we are doubling down on security and providing leading-edge features for users to help protect their data. At Zoom, we continuously adapt as the security threat landscape evolves, with the goal of keeping our users protected.”

How Post-Quantum E2E Encryption Works

When users enable E2EE for their meetings, Zoom’s system is designed to provide only the participants with access to the encryption keys that are used to encrypt the meeting; this is the behavior for both post-quantum E2EE and standard E2EE.

Because Zoom’s servers do not have the necessary decryption key, encrypted data relayed through Zoom’s servers is indecipherable.

In addition, to defend against “harvest now, decrypt later” attacks, Zoom’s post-quantum E2E encryption uses Kyber 768, an algorithm being standardized by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) as the Module Lattice-based Key Encapsulation Mechanism, or ML-KEM, in FIPS 203.

This blog post has been re-published by kind permission of Zoom – View the Original Article

For more information about Zoom - visit the Zoom Website

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Call Centre Helper is not responsible for the content of these guest blog posts. The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect those of Call Centre Helper.

Author: Zoom

Published On: 22nd May 2024
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